Home/Our Campaigns/Strengthening Parent’s Voices in Schools Bill (AB 2261)

STRENGTHENING PARENT’S VOICES IN SCHOOLS 

Community Representatives are liaisons between schools and the community, and play an important role as problem-solvers in our schools. Yet, they are essentially treated like temporary employees. They cannot work more than 90 days or a total of 720 hours in one year. This limits most Community Representatives to less than four hours of paid work per day even though they often dedicate 8 or more hours to students and families every school day.

Community Representatives are exempt from classified employee service. This makes them “at will” employees who can be terminated at any time for no reason at all.

How we’re addressing the issue

In March, SEIU Local 99 helped to put forth AB 2261—a state legislative bill authored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman—to address this issue.

AB 2261 will update the California Education Code (Section 45258) to allow Community Representatives to foster stronger ties with more parents and help more students succeed by:

  • Lifting the cap on Community Representative work hours.
  • Allowing school sites to invest in keeping their parent centers open and accessible for more time during the school year.
  • Making the Community Representative position a permanent, classified position. As classified employees, they will gain the same “just cause” job protections that all other classified employees have.

AB 2261 will also revise Section 45258 of the California Education Code and make the Community Representative position a classified position. As classified employees,  they will gain just cause job protections that all other classified employees have.

Claudia Duron (far right), a Community Representative at Nueva Vista Elementary, hosts a meeting with parent volunteers at the school’s parent center. 

Where’s the Bill?

Legislative bills move progressively in steps from one committee to another, to the assembly floor, to the senate floor, and lastly – to the Governor’s desk. This timeline plots out the key milestones the bill must go through before landing on the Governor’s desk. Follow the bill’s progression in more detail on the California Legislative Information website.

February 13
March 19 – 21
April 18
May 25
May 29
May 30 – June 7
June 13
June 25
August 31
September 30

February 13

The first draft of the bill is read for the first time and may be referred to a committee in March.

March 19 – 21

The bill is referred to and read in the Committee on Public Employees, Retirement, and Social Security. The bill is amended in the committee and re-referred to the committee for a second reading.

April 18

Bill passes Committee on Public Employees, Retirement, and Social Security and is referred to the Assembly Committee on Appropriations. Read the committee’s analysis of the bill.

May 25

Bill is passed by the Assembly Committee on Appropriations and will now go to the Senate floor for voting. Read the committee’s analysis of the bill.

May 29

Bill is approved by State Assembly and now moves to the Senate. Read the Assembly’s analysis of the bill.

May 30 – June 7

Bill is read for the first time in the Senate and passed to the Committee on Rules, which refers it to the Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations.

June 13

Bill passes the Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations and is re-referred to the Senate Committee on Appropriations. Read the committee’s analysis of the bill.

June 25

The Senate Committee on Appropriations will determine the cost of the bill to the state. The committee can do two things:

  1. If it determines that the bill has no fiscal impact to the state, it will pass through the committee and go to the full Senate for a vote. We have until August 31 for approval from the Senate.
  2. Move it into the suspense file. This means that the bill is put on hold to review its impact on the state budget. If AB 2261 goes into the suspense file, the committee will need to vote it out of committee and send it to the Senate floor. This vote will likely take place in August when the legislature returns from summer break.

August 31

The deadline for the Senate to vote on the bill. After this, the bill will go to the Governor’s desk.

September 30

Deadline for Governor Brown to sign or veto AB 2261.

Where’s the Bill?

Legislative bills move progressively in steps from one committee to another, to the assembly floor, to the senate floor, and lastly – to the Governor’s desk. This timeline plots out the key milestones the bill must go through before landing on the Governor’s desk. Follow the bill’s progression in more detail on the California Legislative Information website.

February 13
March 19 – 21
April 18
May 25
May 29
May 30 – June 7
June 13
June 25
August 31
September 30

February 13

The first draft of the bill is read for the first time and may be referred to a committee in March.

March 19 – 21

The bill is referred to and read in the Committee on Public Employees, Retirement, and Social Security. The bill is amended in the committee and re-referred to the committee for a second reading.

April 18

Bill passes Committee on Public Employees, Retirement, and Social Security and is referred to the Assembly Committee on Appropriations. Read the committee’s analysis of the bill.

May 25

Bill is passed by the Assembly Committee on Appropriations and will now go to the Senate floor for voting. Read the committee’s analysis of the bill.

May 29

Bill is approved by State Assembly and now moves to the Senate. Read the Assembly’s analysis of the bill.

May 30 – June 7

Bill is read for the first time in the Senate and passed to the Committee on Rules, which refers it to the Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations.

June 13

Bill passes the Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations and is re-referred to the Senate Committee on Appropriations. Read the committee’s analysis of the bill.

June 25

The Senate Committee on Appropriations will determine the cost of the bill to the state. The committee can do two things:

  1. If it determines that the bill has no fiscal impact to the state, it will pass through the committee and go to the full Senate for a vote. We have until August 31 for approval from the Senate.
  2. Move it into the suspense file. This means that the bill is put on hold to review its impact on the state budget. If AB 2261 goes into the suspense file, the committee will need to vote it out of committee and send it to the Senate floor. This vote will likely take place in August when the legislature returns from summer break.

August 31

The deadline for the Senate to vote on the bill. After this, the bill will go to the Governor’s desk.

September 30

Deadline for Governor Brown to sign or veto AB 2261.

Your Participation Matters

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Summer Fund for Classified School EmployeesStrengthening Parent's Voices in Schools (AB 2261)November ElectionCollective Bargaining Rights for Child Care Providers